Truthfulness and High Performance Teams

Mike Caspar has another great post, this time about being truthful about the challenges of working in a high performance team environment.

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ScrumMaster + OpenAgile + Kanban training in Waterloo November 9-11,2011

We have an upcoming three-day agile training seminar in Waterloo on November 9-11, 2011.

In this unique seminar, we will be offering a practical view of three important Agile methods: OpenAgile – used for general agile project management and agile teamwork including projects and organizations doing any kind of work. Scrum – used for software new product development and IT project management. Kanban – used for teams doing operational work.

This seminar contributes towards three certification programs: the Scrum Alliance’s Certified ScrumMaster program, the OpenAgile Team Member level and the IPMA/PMAC Agile Project Management certification.

For more information and http://www.berteigconsulting.com/UpcomingAgileScrumOpenAgileSeminars register: http://www.berteigconsulting.com/UpcomingAgileScrumOpenAgileSeminars

Proudly delivered by Berteig Consulting, a Canadian organization since 2004.

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Looking Back: Three Agile Practices to do Now!

Back in May of 2008 I wrote an article that I feel is timely to remind everyone of: “The Best Agile Practices to Implement Now!”  I hope you enjoy it and, more importantly, are able to immediately apply these practices!

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What is Scrum good for?

I have worked with a lot of people, teams and organizations over the last 8 years helping them to adopt Scrum and I have seen some interesting patterns about where Scrum works well and where it doesn’t work so well. I wanted to share my observations to see if they correlate with what other people are experiencing.

So first off, I want to describe what I mean by Scrum working well:

  1. Teams using Scrum are obviously high-performance teams whose business results are at least 4x that of normal teams.
  2. The organization in which Scrum is being used experiences a change in culture to become more team oriented, more value oriented, and more customer oriented.

So now I can describe where I have observed Scrum to work really well:

  1. When an organization (or team) is in deep trouble and willing to admit it adopting Scrum seems to be a catalyst for creating a new culture, process and team environment where getting out of trouble is possible. This is Scrum for Crisis. The “willing to admit it” part is extremely important as I have worked with two organizations where the “deep trouble” part was obvious to me as an external person, but in both cases management and staff did not seem willing to admit the depth of their crisis and in both cases Scrum failed to act as a catalyst to get them out of trouble. In this use of Scrum, sometimes resolving the crisis then leads back to complacency and Scrum fades away.
  2. Small growing organizations that have no existing formal processes for development can use Scrum as an effective way to maintain their high-performance without getting burdened in bureaucracy. In this case, it is important to note that they are _already_ in a high performance state and their struggle is to maintain that while at the same time growing. I’ve worked with quite a number of small organizations where all they need is the CSM (plus maybe one or two days of coaching) to adopt and maintain Scrum. I have also worked with small organizations that were _not_ already high performance and Scrum has not typically worked to bump them up to a high-performance state.
  3. Pure new product development where a single strong Product Owner can be identified who has the authority to make product decisions independently of anyone else (including product budget decisions). By “pure new product development” I mean that neither the individual team members nor the team as a whole have any responsibilities outside of the product work – there is no “fractional allocation” or “resource levelling” across projects or products. The strong Product Owner is critical to success with Scrum and must understand the principles of Scrum as well as the mechanics of being a Product Owner.

I have also seen Scrum be inappropriate and not lead to the results I mentioned above:

  1. Management teams. It seems like Scrum could or should work for management teams, but it appears that managers have too much of the following problems to be able to use Scrum:
    - operational responsibilities (non-creative, non-problem-solving work)
    - urgent, legitimate interruptions (e.g. an escalated customer issue)
    - real commitments to events or projects that are calendar based (e.g. a management off-site)
    - ego: they don’t want to follow an apparently rigid process or they are always happy to make exceptions for themselves
    Again, one might imagine that Scrum _should_ work to help resolve these issues, but unfortunately I have never seen it able to do so in this context.
  2. Small teams/projects. Scrum is too heavy for teams less than 5 people or for projects shorter than 2 months in total duration. Those numbers aren’t meant to be hard and fast, but when I’ve seen small teams/projects attempt to do Scrum they _always_ end up breaking lots of the rules partly because they can and partly because they must. That said, some folks have created “Personal Scrum” and other variants. I’m not sure if we as the Scrum Alliance officially recognize/endorse those variants.
  3. Purely operational work. There just isn’t enough creativity/problem-solving to make the Sprint an appropriate process element, nor the Product Backlog an appropriate organizing mechanism. I have seen some operational environments get some benefit from doing regular retrospectives, but just doing retrospectives is not Scrum in my book. My experience with Kanban is still a little limited, but it seems to be an appropriate approach for these environments.
  4. Organizations where there is very little need to change. I’ve spent some time working with big profitable banks to adopt agile and without exception, they just can’t wrap their minds around the need for Scrum… because they are already so successful as a business. The general attitude is that Scrum is popular therefore we will call what we are doing “Scrum”, but it really isn’t. It’s Scrummerfall and Scrum-Butt wrapped up in the terminology of Scrum. They will adopt some Agile practices and get very modest benefits. I have seen minor improvements in team morale and minor improvements in quality and productivity, but certainly not anything near to what is possible for improvements. When we do assessments in this type of environment, we see Value Stream maps with waste at the 80-90% level so there is huge room for improvement… but it just doesn’t happen.

Scrum can definitely transform the world of product development. It can definitely act as a catalyst to get teams and organizations out of crisis. But that isn’t the whole world of work. I’m also concerned about the idea of using Scrum for general project management. There might be some good practices that are part of Scrum that would also be valuable in general project management (e.g. regular retrospectives, daily team meetings) but that doesn’t make Scrum a general project management framework.

I don’t claim that any of the above observations are “correct”. That’s partly why I am sharing – I would love to have a good discussion here about this because I think it is critical for us as Agilists to be able to answer this question well when we are asked: “what is Scrum good for?” – particularly since Scrum is by far the most popular Agile method.

I would love to hear other people’s observations about where Scrum works well (as I have defined “well” above) vs. where it either is only a modest improvement to existing approaches or where it might even not work at all.

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Why we SCRUM: Achieving Hyper-productivity. Presented by Myplanet Digital and Berteig Consulting

On Friday, October 28th at 1pm join Paul Heidema from Berteig Consulting and Shanly Suepaul from Myplanet Digital as we discuss what Scrum is, how we use it at Myplanet Digital and how Scrum can help your team.
 
Scrum is the lifeblood of Myplanet. When executed properly it empowers teams and individuals to stay motivated and achieve excellence. Most importantly, Scrum allows us to continually learn and improve our people and teams.
At Berteig Consulting, we are experts at using agile methods such as Scrum to transform people, process and culture in order to produce high-performance teams and organizations. From ScrumAlliance.org: “Scrum is an agile framework for completing complex projects. Scrum originally was formalized for software development projects, but works well for any complex, innovative scope of work. The possibilities are endless.”

Sign up here: https://eval.webex.com/eval/onstage/g.php?t=a&d=924723906 


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Estimation – Bad Advice

Here’s a fun article on PMI.org.  By omission, it gives some very bad advice about estimation.  What is it missing?  Asking the people who are going to do the work!!!  Any estimation method or approach that fails to ask the actual human beings who are going to do the work about the effort required is going to be badly wrong.  (Of course, even asking the people who are going to do the work is no guarantee of good estimates.)

The starting point of the linked article is a study that showed 90% of projects having cost overruns.  To me, this just shows the futility of predicting the future, not anything about how we can (and should?) make better estimates.

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OpenAgile Team Member training in Markham November 17-18 th, 2011

We have an upcoming Agile training in Toronto on November 17-18th, 2011.  This is a special Agile training because it is an OpenAgile Team Member training – which is the most widely applicable Agile method!  This two-day training seminar is designed to help you use OpenAgile principles and processes to improve productivity, efficiency and quality in your team, project and operational environments. This is the official OpenAgile Team Member training and provides the basic skills and knowledge to work with OpenAgile as a team member.

For more information and to register visit: http://www.berteigconsulting.com/UpcomingAgileScrumOpenAgileSeminars

Proudly delivered by Berteig Consulting, a Canadian organization since 2004

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Good Explanation of INVEST for User Stories

Mike Caspar, a fellow agile coach,  just forwarded me this YouTube video to Bill Wake talking about INVEST for User Stories.  I worked briefly with Bill back in 2004/2005 at Capital One where he did some excellent coaching.  I strongly recommend checking out the video!

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Upcoming Agile Training in Ottawa October 31-November 1

We have an upcoming Certified ScrumMaster (CSM) training in Ottawa on August 15-16. This two-day Scrum training is full of great features including:

  • Facilitated by Certified Scrum Trainer ™ Mark Levison, an Agile expert since 2001
  • Classroom management using agile methods so that you can learn by example
  • Two intensive days of training with exercises, simulations, discussion and lecture
  • plus much more!

For more information and to register visit: http://www.berteigconsulting.com/UpcomingAgileScrumOpenAgileSeminars

Proudly delivered by Berteig Consulting, a Canadian organization.

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ScrumMaster + OpenAgile + Kanban training in Toronto October 26-28,2011

We have an upcoming three-day agile training seminar in Toronto on October 26-28, 2011.

In this unique seminar, we will be offering a practical view of three important Agile methods: OpenAgile – used for general agile project management and agile teamwork including projects and organizations doing any kind of work. Scrum – used for software new product development and IT project management. Kanban – used for teams doing operational work.

This seminar contributes towards three certification programs: the Scrum Alliance’s Certified ScrumMaster program, the OpenAgile Team Member level and the IPMA/PMAC Agile Project Management certification.

For more information and http://www.berteigconsulting.com/UpcomingAgileScrumOpenAgileSeminars register: http://www.berteigconsulting.com/UpcomingAgileScrumOpenAgileSeminars

Proudly delivered by Berteig Consulting, a Canadian organization since 2004.

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Agile Outside of Software

The manifesto for agile software development (http://agilemanifesto.org) consists of 4 basic values:

1. Individuals and interactions over processes and tools?
2. Working software over comprehensive documentation?
3. Customer collaboration over contract negotiation?
4. Responding to change over following a plan

I’ve been thinking about how this manifesto applies outside of the world of software, for which it was originally created. These concepts are so engrained into various agile methodologies, which these days don’t explicitly refer to software any longer, that it begs the question: how does a team apply these four values to their work outside of software development; specifically, what would replace delivering ‘working software’? The other three values translate more fluidly to differing spheres of work. For example, whether in the field of business, sales, medicine, etc. placing greater value on all the items on the left over those on the right will produce a transformed culture and working environment. But what does ‘working software’ translate into in these various realms? Particularly relevant for non-profit organizations, the next possible question would be: what if we are not creating a ‘product’ or something that is ‘shippable’? What I’ve found to be the methodology which most aptly addresses this question is OpenAgile.

On its website: www.openagile.com it is noted that: OpenAgile is a learning system designed to help individuals, teams, and organizations build capacity for rapidly delivering value to their stakeholders. Rather than the focus being on a product, the aim shifts to learning and value. Yes, the ‘product’, if there is one (software or other), is important, but now there are even greater possibilities for the use of agile outside of software.

Though almost deceivingly simple, the principles animating OpenAgile are extremely profound. Through practicing the core foundational principles of truthfulness, consultative decision making, and systematic learning (through reflection, learning, planning, and action – all in light of guidance) the potential ability to ‘deliver’ something valuable is extraordinarily enhanced. Indeed, the greatest value could even be the learning that has taken place from the team or individuals themselves, the changed culture now animated by consultation engendering collaboration rather than competition, the regular and ongoing practice of truthfulness in a team resulting in accelerated transformation (potentially also allowing for that team to be more committed and driven to delivering a ‘product’) and the creation of a space where continual learning is the hallmark.

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Introduction to OpenAgile Half-Day Workshop – Nov. 4, 2011 in Toronto

For those of you who are in the Toronto area, you might be interested in a half-day session being put on by Berteig Consulting: an Introduction to OpenAgile.  There are two sessions scheduled for Friday Nov. 4 – one in the morning, one in the afternoon.  The price is $50/person and at the end of the session, you will be fully prepared to write the OpenAgile “Readiness” certificate exam.  The session is being held at the Hilton in downtown Toronto.  The session agenda is as follows:

  1. Welcome
  2. History and Purpose of OpenAgile
  3. Foundations of OpenAgile
  4. Overview of OpenAgile Processes
  5. OpenAgile Capacity-Building
  6. Benefits of OpenAgile
  7. Case Study: Suncor
  8. Q&A

Register now for the Introduction to OpenAgile morning session.

Register now for the Introduction to OpenAgile afternoon session.

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