A View From the Stands: Open Agile Conference, Toronto 2015

 

Valerie Senyk 20150505 white background - head - 275 squareI was (wo)manning the Berteig booth for most of this day-long event with my colleague Nima Honarmandan, since we were one of the Open Agile Conference sponsors. Still, I was able to nip away and take in a seminar called “Value: From Meh to Wow” delivered by Mike Edwards, author of leadingforchange.ca

After a personal introductory story about his dog dying while he was away from home, and WestJet Corporation’s remarkable assistance to him to get home as soon as possible, he listed three kinds of value: that which is monetized, that which is frugal and that which has a wow factor.

He believes WestJet has the wow factor because people are not just numbers or resources to them – people are truly people. He said that the employees of WestJet are empowered to act as if they’re owners, and so can make important (and compassionate) decisions for people on a case by case basis.

Edwards feels companies need to know what their customers’ values are, and allow themselves to align with them. Companies cannot hope to “wow” people with freebies. His point was that to create a wow factor in one’s business one needs to focus on relationships.

In an exercise, he had attendees make 3 columns on a sheet of paper. The first column was to list our employers’ values, the second to list our own values, and the third to list our customers’ values. I was “wowed” to see that, as regards my own employment and our customers, there was a great degree of alignment between all three groups, valuing such things as learning, honesty, encouragement, responsiveness and agility.

As for most of my day in the stands (at the Berteig booth), I observed that agilists (practitioners of Agile) are, by and large, very caring and user-friendly people. Between seminar sessions, hundred of them flowed through the hallways. Many of them greeted each other like long-lost buddies with big hugs, many engaged in in-depth conversations, and most were joyful and energetic.

As my colleague Nima and I met people at our booth, responded to questions, and handed out packs of Estimation Cards (freebies are fun at an event like this), I mused on the blessing of human contact. As wisdom would have it, there is a time for all aspects of life: to work, to learn, to rest, and a time to enjoy the diversity of our human family.


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