Category Archives: Agile Engineering

Dependecy Injection on J2ME/CLDC devices.

This post is a little geeky and technical and product-related for AgileAdvice, and is a shameless self-promotion. Nevertheless, since testability, test-driven-development, and incremental design are non-exclusive sub-topics of Agile, I though I’d report this here anyway.

Many developers use the Dependency Injection and Inversion of Control (IoC) patterns through such IoC containers as Spring, Hivemind, Picocontainer, and others. They have all sorts of benefits to testability, flexibility, etc. that I won’t repeat here, but can be read about here, here, and here. A great summary of the history of “IoC” can be found here. J2ME developers, however, especially those on limited devices that use the CLDC configuration of J2ME, cannot use the substantial number of IoC/DI containers out there, because they nearly all rely on reflection. These also often make use of APIs not present in the CLDC – APIs which could not easily be added. Lastly there’s a tendency among developers of “embedded software” to be very suspicious of complexity.

In working out some examples of DI as part of a testability workshop at one of my clients, I whipped up a quick DI container, and being the freak that I am, hardened it until it was suitable for production, because I hate half-finished products. So allow me to introduce the Israfil Micro Container. (That is, the Container from the Israfil Micro project). As I mention in the docs, “FemtoContainer” just was too ridiculous, and this container is smaller than pico-container. The project is BSD licensed, and hosted on googlecode, so source is freely available and there’s an issue/feature tracker, yadda yadda.

Essentially I believe that people working on cellphones and set-top boxes shouldn’t be constrained out of some basic software design approaches – you just have to bend the design approach to fit the environment. So hopefully this is of use to more than one of my clients. It currently supports an auto-wiring registration, delayed object creation (until first need), and forthcoming are some basic lifecycle support, and a few other nicities. It does not use reflection (you use a little adapter for object creation instead), and performs quicker than pico-container. Low, low overhead. It’s also less than 10 classes and interfaces (including the two classes in the util project). It’s built with Maven2, so you can use it in any Maven2-built project with ease, but of course you can always also just download the jar (and the required util jar too). Enjoy…

P.S. There are a few other bits on googlecode that I’m working on in the micro-zone. Some minimalist backports of some of java.lang.concurrency (just the locks), as well as some of the java.util.Collections stuff. Not finished, but also part of the googlecode project.


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Quality is not an attribute, it’s a mindset

This was actually cribbed from a Bruce Schneier blog post about security…

Security engineers see the world differently than other engineers. Instead of focusing on how systems work, they focus on how systems fail, how they can be made to fail, and how to prevent–or protect against–those failures. Most software vulnerabilities don’t ever appear in normal operations, only when an attacker deliberately exploits them. So security engineers need to think like attackers.People without the mindset sometimes think they can design security products, but they can’t. And you see the results all over society–in snake-oil cryptography, software, Internet protocols, voting machines, and fare card and other payment systems. Many of these systems had someone in charge of “security” on their teams, but it wasn’t someone who thought like an attacker.  

There’s an interesting parallel between this statement and how most software quality is handled. Quality and Security are similar. In fact, I see security as a very specific subset of quality-mindedness. Certainly both require the same mindset to ensure – rather than thinking merely “how will this work”, a quality-focused person will also, or perhaps alternately think: “how might this be breakable”. From this simple change in thinking flows several important approaches

  • Constraint-based thinking (as opposed to solution based thinking): allows an architect/developer to conceive of the set of possible solutions, rather than an enumeration of solutions. By looking at constraints, a developer implements the lean principle of deciding as late as possible, with as full information as possible.
  • Test-First: As one thinks of how it might break, scenarios emerge that can form the basis of test cases. These cases form a sort of executable acceptance criteria
  • Lateral Thinking: The constraint+test approach starts to get people into a very different mode, where vastly different kinds of solutions show up. The creative exercise of trying to break something provides insights that can change the whole approach of the system.

 Schneier goes on to ponder 

This mindset is difficult to teach, and may be something you’re born with or not. But in order to train people possessing the mindset, they need to search for and find security vulnerabilities–again and again and again. And this is true regardless of the domain. Good cryptographers discover vulnerabilities in others’ algorithms and protocols. Good software security experts find vulnerabilities in others’ code. Good airport security designers figure out new ways to subvert airport security. And so on.  

 Here again – I think it’s possible to help people get a mind-set about quality, but some do seem to have a knack. It’s important to have some of these people on your teams, as they’ll disturb the waters and identify potential failure modes. These are going to be the ones who want to “mistake proof” (to borrow Toyota’s phrase) the system by writing more unit tests and other executable proofs of the system. But most importantly (and I can personally testify to this) it is critical that people just write more tests. It is a learned skill to start to think of “how might this fail” until it becomes a background mental thread, always popping up risk models.A related concept is Demmings’ “systems-thinking”, which, applied to software quality, causes one to start looking at whole ecosystems of error states. This is when fearless re-factoring starts to pay off, because the elimination of duplication allows one to catch classes of error in fewer and fewer locations, where they’re easier to fix. There are many and multifarious spin-off effects of this inverted questioning and the mindset it generates. Try it yourself. When you’re writing code, ask yourself how you might break it? What inputs, external state, etc. might cause it to fail, crash, or behave in odd ways. This starts to show you where you might have state leaking into the wild, or side-effects from excessively complex interactions in your code. So quality focus can start to improve not only the external perception of your product, but also its fitness to new requirements by making it more resilient and less brittle. Cleaner interactions and less duplication allow for much faster implementation of new features.I could go on, but I just wanted to convey this sense of “attitude” or “mindset,” over mere technique. Technique can help you get to a certain level, but you have to let it “click”, and the powerful questions can sometimes help.


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The cost of building

Building software is expensive. I’m not talking about creating software, I mean taking software as written (source code) and running it through compilers and linkers and post-processors and packagers and obfuscators and installer-generators. It might not seem so, but look under the covers and you will find a wealth of costs and potential savings…

Lifecycle of the Developer

The developer has a concept he needs to translate into software. He (or she) does not sit and meditate until it comes to him, then streams it effortlessly into the computer. Rather he tries something, and tries something else, and writes some conditions (tests) to limit the scope of his options, and cycles over and over and over again between four main activities: creating -> building -> executing tests -> discovering. The developer then wraps around, having discovered and learned (found the bug or identified a future direction) and begins to create again.

If you break this down, there are two states – active and waiting – that the developer is in at any point. He is active when he is learning and he is active when he is creating. He is waiting when he is building and executing tests. So the developer’s ability to do further learning/creative work comes from how long he has to wait for building/executing the software.

Continue reading The cost of building


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Estimating Software Projects

There is an interesting article called “Software Estimates and the Parable of the Cave“. It starts out well. The cave parable is effective and clearly conveys the problem with estimating software work. However, there is a big section of the article called “Applying this Wisdom” which I think does a dis-service to everyone. Let’s look at this closely…

Continue reading Estimating Software Projects


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Automated Testing

In agile software development, automated testing plays a big role due to the emphasis on quality. A friend of mine, Tom Cooper, whom I worked with a few years ago at a major capital markets firm, passed these links on to me yesterday. There are some folks at NIST and the Univ. of Texas who are building a tool called FireEye. Here is the press release, here is the pdf presentation.


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Agile and Lean Defect Tracking

Lisa Crispin has written an excellent article about defect tracking in agile environments. The article is a couple of months old now, but if you haven’t read it yet, you definitely should! I particularly like the perspective that Mary Poppendieck offers in the article…

Continue reading Agile and Lean Defect Tracking


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Effects of Defects: Grey Scope Creep

Is boosting productivity simple? Yes! Just cut code! One problem here. The gap between code complete and feature done is bigger then it appears. That was my thought as I was looking at statistics.

Continue reading Effects of Defects: Grey Scope Creep


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Technical Debt

Last night I was thinking more about the analogy of technical debt. In this analogy, design and quality flaws in a team’s work become a “debt” that must eventually be paid back. This analogy is fantastic because it can be taken just a little bit further to understand just how bad defects are…

Continue reading Technical Debt


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The Seven Core Practices of Agile Work

Agile Work consists of seven core practices. These practices form a solid starting point for any person, team or community that wishes to follow the Middle Way to Excellence.

Self-Organizing Team

Any group of people that wish to be an Agile Team need to take the initiative to determine for themselves how they are going to work (process) and how they are going to do the work (product). The term “team” really applies quite broadly to any size group of people that are working together towards a common goal.

Teams go through stages of development as they perform their work. The most important result of team development is the team itself, and not the specific skills and abilities that the individuals learn.

If the team is part of a broader organization, that organization must give the team the authority, space and safety to learn to be self-organizing. The organization’s leadership is responsible for determining the “why?”, some constraints on “how?”, and then letting the team respond to the need as best as it can.

Also Known As: Whole Team (Extreme Programming), Cross-Functional Team (business management).

Deliver Frequently

Agile Work uses short fixed periods of time to frame the process of delivering something of value. Each of these iterations or timeboxes is structured so that the team or group actually finishes a piece of work and delivers it to stakeholders. Then, the team builds on what has previously been delivered to do it again in the same short amount of time.

The sooner that valuable results can be delivered, the more value can be obtained from those results. This extra value is derived from opportunities such as earlier sales, competitive advantage, early feedback, and risk reduction.

There is an explicit tradeoff: the shorter the time to delivery, the smaller the piece of value will be. But, like investing in one’s retirement account, the earlier you start, even with small amounts of money, the better off you are in the long run.

Also Known As: Sprint (Scrum), Iteration (Extreme Programming), Timeboxing (generic), Time Value of Money (accounting).

Plan to Learn

Every type of work is governed by a Horizon of Predictability. Any plan that extends beyond this horizon of predictability is bound to fail. Agile work uses an explicit learning cycle tied in with the planning of work to accomodate this inevitable change.

First, a goal is required. This goal can be long-term. Teams using Agile Work then create a queue of work items to be done in order to reach this goal. Each iteration, some of these items are selected, finished and then the queue is adjusted. The changes in the work queue are based on external factors, and learning that the team does as it goes.

One of the most effective methods for the team to learn about how it is doing its work is the retrospective. After each delivery of results, the team holds a retrospective to examine how it can improve.

Also Known As: Inspect and Adapt (Scrum), Kaizen (Lean), Adaptive Planning (generic).

Communicate Powerfully

A team needs to have effective means of communicating, both amongst team members and also to stakeholders. To Communicate Powerfully, a team needs to prefer in-person communication over distributed communication. Synchronous over asynchronous communication. High-bandwidth over low-bandwidth communication. Multi-mode communication over single-mode communication.

The results of failing to communicate powerfully include wasted time for waiting, misunderstandings leading to defects or re-work, slower development of trust, slower team-building, and ultimately a failure to align perceptions of reality.

The single most effective means to communicate powerfully, is to put all the team in a room together where they can do their work, every day for the majority of the work time.

Some types of work do not lend themselves to this approach (e.g. creating a documentary video), but every effort should be made to improve communication.

Also Known As: Visibility (Scrum), Whole Team and Team Room (Extreme Programming), War Room (business management).

Test Everything

Defects are one of the most critical types of waste to eliminate from a work process. By testing everything, by driving all the work of a team by creating test cases to check the work, a team can reach extremely high quality levels. This ability to prevent defects is so important that only an executive level decision should be considered sufficient to allow defects into a work process. Quality is not negotiable.

In Agile Work, removing a defect is the only type of work that takes priority over any new features/functionality/production. If the end result desired is to maximize value, then removing defects is an important means to that end.

A team has an ethical duty to discover new ways to effectively test their work. This can be through the use of tools, various feedback mechanisms, automation, and good old problem-solving abilities.

Also Known As: Canary in the Coal Mine (Scrum), Test-Driven Development (Extreme Programming), Defects per Opportunities (Six-Sigma).

Measure Value

Since Reality is Perceived, it is important for an agile team and organization to have a clear method of describing and perceiving what is important for the organization. Measuring value is a critical method for describing and perceiving what is important.

A single metric can be used to drive all the measurement and goal-setting and rewards in an organization. All other measurements are secondary and must be treated as such: limited in use and temporary.

There are many things which are easier to measure than value. It is often easy to measure cost, or hours worked, or defects found, or estimate vs. actual… etc. However, all of these other measurements either implicitly or explicitly drive sub-optimal behavior.

Also Known As: Measuring Results (Scrum), ROI (business management), Economic Driver (Good to Great), Running Tested Features (Extreme Programming).

Clear the Path

Everyone in an organization using Agile Work takes responsibility for clearing the path, removing the obstacles that prevent work from being done effectively. Clearing the Path doesn’t just mean expedient, quick fixes to problems, but rather taking the time to look at an obstacle and do the best possible to remove it permanently so that it never blocks the path again.

In the Agile Work method, the Process Facilitator is the person who is responsible for tracking obstacles and ensuring that the path is cleared. To do this, the Process Facilitator maintains a Record of Obstacles.

Clearing the Path is sometimes painful work that exposes things we would rather not deal with. As a result, it is critical that people build their capacity for truthfulness and work to develop trust amongst each other. Building a capacity for truthfulness is not something that can be done by using an explicit process.

Also Known As: Removing Obstacles (Scrum), Stopping the Line (Lean).


Remember also, that these practices must always be viewed and implemented in the context of the Agile Axioms. These axioms provide a check to ensure that the practices are not being applied blindly, but rather applied appropriately to the given situation.


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Nice Interview with Mary Poppendieck

Mary and I worked together for a short time almost two years ago now. When we worked together I was impressed by her honesty, insight and wisdom. Here is a brief on-line interview she has done. It is focused on software development, but many of the ideas she discusses can be easily translated into other types of work.


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Quality is Not Negotiable

Most of the teams and organizations I coach are working on using agile methods to improve their software development approach. Somewhere along the way, someone has realized that there must be a better way… either better than chaos, or better than bureaucracy. Over the years that I have been practicing agile methods, I have come to believe that quality is not negotiable.

Continue reading Quality is Not Negotiable


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Just In Case You Haven’t Seen It Yet

There is a fantastic article about software productivity: http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/HighNotes.html. I love Joel’s writing style, and this article in particular has important lessons for us all, regardless of our profession: find what you can be the best at, and do that. Interestingly enough this is part of the message of the book Good to Great but applied to a whole corporation. It also applies in the context of self-organizing teams: each individual should be able to find/learn in what way they can best contribute and do that more than they do other stuff.


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The True Cost of Software

From the Link: Calculating the True Price of Software by Robert Lefkowitz — Businesses have long viewed support and maintenance as essential components of software. Open source business models often focus on charging for support and customization. Is there an economic model that can demonstrate the true worth of a piece of software and the option for support, maintenance, and upgrades? Robert Lefkowitz argues that open source exposes the true value of software itself as, essentially, worth less in comparison to support and maintenance.


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Test-Driven Work

In an agile environment, all work done needs to be directly related to the needs of stakeholders. Stakeholders request or “pull” work from the team, and they do this by defining prioritized work packages. The team needs some way to know when they have completed a work package, so both work packages and iteration tasks need to have testable acceptance or success criteria. The team collaborates with the stakeholders to determine what needs to be done to successfully complete a work package.

Continue reading Test-Driven Work


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The Qualities of an Ideal Test

These six qualities of tests describe how to make a test as effective and as useful as possible. The qualities are similar in style to the INVEST qualities of user stories – but they don’t form a nice acronym.

Continue reading The Qualities of an Ideal Test


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