Category Archives: Links to Agile Info

Are Agile Teams Just More Comfortable Being Uncomfortable?

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Stretch Goals - failure can be disasterous

Lately I’ve been appreciating the Top 100 Agile Websites compiled by Oikosofy.

Just out of curiosity, I thought I’d check out Number 100, just to see who was the lucky guy who wasn’t listed as number 101.

What I found was a delightfully surprising and pleasantly entertaining blog by a coach named Yves Hanoulle. One article which particularly caught my attention is called “Getting out of your comfort zone.”

8 key points for coaches creating safety for their teams
  1. Getting out of your comfort zone is important for personal improvement  
  2. When you do experiements as a coach to learn people about this, people might see things differently, because of their earlier experiences.  
  3. Give people a safe environment so they can learn to push their boundaries.  
  4. People need to feel safe to move out of their comfort zone.  
  5. The Safety Zone is bigger then Comfort Zone.
  6.  Stepping out of your Comfort zone increases the size of Safety Zone.
  7.  Staying to long in your Comfort Zone decreases your safe zone.
  8. Safety zone is perceived.

His reflections after a training seminar on the topic really made a lot of sense to me.

Basically, an agile team is striving to create a Safe Zone for themselves and their team-mates so people will take risks and move out of their comfort zone. In order to do this, they are or become really comfortable with that uneasy state of being uncomfortable.

It’s as though it is no longer uncomfortable to be uncomfortable.

When an agile team moves out of its Comfort Zone together and everyone feels safe and supported, the end result is the type of team described in the Agile Manifesto. It’s the type of team companies really get excited about. It’s the type of team people love to work with and in doing so they may find they love their work more than ever.


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Link: Self-Driving Cars and Code Test Coverage

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Mike Caspar has another thought provoking article, this one about self-driving cars and code test coverage.

Personally, I don’t want to let a vehicle drive me where the developers have been pressured (or the developers have decided on their own) to write code without tests…. I am just thinking about my future and I don’t want this topic to come up when it’s far too late for myself, family or friends.

Dear reader: if you have anyone connected to the auto industry and self-driving vehicles, please share Mike’s blog post!


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Example of Visualizing Process Cycle Efficiency with LEGO

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In-depth article here: Using Lego[sic] to capture raw data for Cycle Time and Process Cycle Efficiency.

From the article:

The typical way to collect baseline numbers for these metrics is to conduct a value stream mapping workshop that involves most or all team members for one day or longer. The client is worried about losing too much time in the workshops when the teams could be doing value-add work. Therefore, we needed a less intrusive way to collect baseline measurements. There is also the question of how accurate the PCE data will be when it is obtained through a workshop rather than by direct observation of team activity.

I came up with the idea of using Lego bricks to collect the raw data for Cycle Time and PCE. There is some impact on team member time, but hopefully it is not too intrusive. My observation is that people enjoy manipulating Lego bricks, and they don’t mind sticking the bricks on a plate to represent their work.


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Link: The Cost of Turnover on an Agile Team

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Great article by Mike Griffiths: http://leadinganswers.typepad.com/leading_answers/2015/10/agile-talent-management.html


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Link: It’s Time to Kill Performance Reviews

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For many years, folks in the Agile community have been recommending that performance reviews be eliminated from the corporate world.  In 2005 while coaching at Capital One, I remember many discussions on the awfulness of performance reviews.  This was really my first understanding of the depth of culture change required to be Agile.

Now, this concept of eliminating performance reviews is gaining traction outside the Agile environment.  Here is a great LinkedIn Pulse post by Liz Ryan in which she explains in depth about killing performance reviews.

From her article:

A little voice in the back of my brain nagged at me: “Despite your efforts to make them more compassionate and less uncomfortable for everyone, performance reviews are stupid from the get-go, Liz!

“How does one human being get to evaluate another one, when their personalities and perspectives may be radically different?

Consider using other techniques to help with improvement efforts among your staff.  Lean has Kaizen.  Agile has Retrospectives.

Real Agility means that learning is inherent in the culture of an organization.  Performance reviews establish extrinsic motivators for learning… and all the research points to the idea that learning is much more powerful when it is intrinsically motivated.

Consider some other tools that might help your team to work more effectively, while maintaining intrinsic motivation:

Finally, consider that, at least in Scrum, the concept of a self-organizing, self-managing team makes it very difficult to do performance reviews.  It is hard to apportion “blame” or “praise” to individuals.  Each team member is dynamically deciding what to do based on the needs of the team, their own skills, and their interest.  Team members are often collaborating to solve problems and get work done.  Traditional roles with complex RACI definitions are melted away.  Performance reviews are very difficult under these circumstances.


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Link: Agile in the Classroom

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If you are a long-time reader of Agile Advice, you know I take interest in Agile methods used in non-software environments.  My buddy Mike Caspar has another great story about the use of Agile in the classroom, and in particular, how he has had an impact as a coach.


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Link: Agile Coaching and Flight Instruction – An Emotional Connection

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My friend Mike Caspar has another great blog post: Similarities between Agile Coaching and Flight Instruction.  Check it out!


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Collaborative Estimation Technique: Challenge, Estimate or Override (CEO)

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Great technique described by Shahin Sheidaei on his blog: Challenge, Estimate or Override (CEO) Game for Effective Estimations.  It is much quicker than the Planning Game, and probably a bit slower than the Bucket System.


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Teams and their proximity to the final user

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A great, simple post from Mike Bowler…

Time: Teams that are writing code today that will be used by their customers tomorrow are very focused on what the customers actually need. Teams that are writing code today that won’t be seen by a customer for six months are less engaged.

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/why-teams-care-mike-bowler

Mike Caspar
Passionate About Agile


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Video: Sprint Zero is Not Part of Scrum

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Find out why Sprint Zero is a bad idea, and what you can do instead!

More Scrum and Agile videos to come!  Please subscribe to our WorldMindware channel.


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New Video: Myths of Scrum – A Public Retrospective

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Although subtle, having a public retrospective can do terrible damage to a Scrum team.  In this video I explain what I mean by “public”, why it is so bad, and what you should do instead.  This is part of a video series on the Myths of Scrum that is meant to respond to some of the most common mis-information (myths) about Scrum and Scrum practices.  I will follow-up this video in several weeks with a written article complimentary to this video.  Feel free to let me know in the comments if you have any topics that you would like me to cover in my video series!


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New Video: Myths of Scrum – ScrumMaster Assigns Tasks

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In a few weeks, I will be posting a more detailed written follow-up to this video.  This is one of the most damaging and most common myths (or pitfalls) that ScrumMasters fall into….


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Link: About Development Managers

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My colleague and friend Mike Caspar has posted another insightful article on his blog: Do not create unnecessary fear and animosity with Development Managers.  From the article:

As teams grow, they build confidence and seem to become self-contained, and almost insular to some. This is normal and is not a sign of dysfunction. This simply indicates that the team is starting to have self identity. They are starting to act as a team. This is a good sign…. As the teams become more effective, the Development Manager feels more loss.


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