Link: Strong Teams Start With Trust

One of the positive outcomes of an agile team succeeding in its transformation is the establishment of a high-functioning team.

A high-functioning team works more effectively, efficiently and can innovate more appropriately for the corporate advantage of the business.

Ryan Yeoman has a lot to say on the topic. Although he doesn’t mention agile specifically, he’s right on in his approach.

In his article, “Strong Teams Start With Trust: 5 Ways To Build Trust in Your Teams,” he writes that:

All of them point to trust as a critical and fundamental piece to success – in business and in life.

Piggy-backing all these thoughts and making it personal to myself, trust enables me to be more.  It enables me to:

  • Accomplish more and do better work by getting feedback and synergizing
  • Grow and learn more by allowing myself to be “open” and receive information
  • Teach more and serve by letting me focus my attention on others
  • Care more and empathize because I’m not constantly worried about protecting myself
  • Be more human

Trust helps you accept deepening relationships and removes politics and silos from the work place, creating an organization within which people feel safe. At its simplest, trust is a catalyst for your organization to be more: more nimble, more efficient, more effective.  It’s like oxygen for a successful team – one simply can’t exist without it.

I found his comments insightful and his links appropriate.

This is an excellent article for those team members who are striving for excellence and learning to trust one another, and themselves, in the process.


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Link: The Mythical Product Owner

“When product managers weren’t looking, developers went agile.”

This quote from Barbara Nelson gave me a chuckle. I found it when reading The Mythical Product Owner, by Andre Kaminsky and discovered that this article gives excellent insight into the role of the product owner.

Andre speaks to the change happening in an organization when they adopt agile and breaks it down into bite-sized bits which really helps conceptualize the shifting happening across the industry.

He describes two key levels of change, mainly that:

Change must happen on two levels across the organization:

  • Technical – Roles and responsibilities must be understood, accepted, and adopted.
  • Cultural – Attitudes, expectations, political ambitions, and how we collaborate must change.

He writes that agile should not come in with a “big bang” approach but by introducing it in a gradual manner, allowing confidence and capacity to build, then the results can be more profound and long-lasting.

 


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Announcement: Scrum Alliance newsletter lists Mishkin’s article

In a recent newsletter from the Scrum Alliance, Mishkin’s article about enterprise leadership is listed as a resource.

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REAL AGILITY – SELF-ORGANIZING TEAM CREATION EVENT FOR LARGE-SCALE AGILE ENTERPRISES

Posted By Meghan Robinson, Tuesday, August 16, 2016

 AUTHOR: MISHKIN BERTEIG

In 2005 I had the privilege to participate in the first occurrence of this fantastic technique for organizing large numbers of people into Agile teams.  It happened at Capital One in Richmond Virginia and my colleague of the time, Kara Silva, led this successful experiment.  The problem was that the “teams” that management had set up didn’t make much sense from an Agile perspective.  They were functional teams (e.g. a team of testers).  But to do Agile well, they needed cross-functional, multi-skilled teams that could work well together to deliver great results each iteration.  So Kara and a few other senior people got together all the staff in the department into a big room with a big whiteboard and facilitated a 3 hour meeting to sort out who would be on which team.  Everyone was involved – all the people who would be on the teams were in the room.  Those teams stayed together with the same membership long after that meeting.

The rest of the article can be read here.


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Announcement: New updates in BERTEIG’s newsletter

rachelheadshotEach week there are more and more exciting items to share with our ever-increasing newsletter subscriber list of leaders who, like you, are creating positive change in organizations across Canada.

Rachel Perry, Content & Community Coordinator

Not only do BERTEIG coaches have fantastic insights to contribute to the advancement of the Agile industry, but also our Learning Events – for CSMCSPOCSDSAFe, or Leadership – in both Toronto and Vancouver – continue to expand. In addition, multiple avenues for offering encouragement and support in a variety of ways are opening up all the time.

We are excited to share that last month Agile Advice was viewed 18,000 times. Not only will you find more articles posted than ever before, but you will also discover a new development on the World Mindware page on Agile Advice; detailed accounts of hundreds of positive statements about BERTEIG’s coaches who are some of the leading Agile coaches in the world.

This week we featured Agile Leadership coach, Michael Sahota, on Agile Advice. In September, he will be presenting training for the Certified Agile Leadership (CAL1) training in Toronto. He was the second person to receive the designation to teach this class and the first to offer the training world-wide. He will also be offering a webinar this Wednesday, 24th Aug – register here.

If you haven’t checked out Agile Advice lately, I encourage you to consider taking a peek.


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