Evolution of a Scrum Diagram

Over the many years that I have been teaching Scrum (since 2005!), I have had a diagram of Scrum as part of my slides and/or handouts.  The diagram has gone through several major and minor changes throughout that time.  Here is the progression from oldest to newest:

First Attempt

This diagram was used in some of my earliest slides when I first started delivering Scrum training.  It is bad.  It is woefully incomplete.  But, here it is:

01 Scrum Process Diagram

Second Diagram

I knew the first one was bad so after not too long, I created this next diagram as a supplement that was meant to show the whole Scrum process all in one page. Similar to other Scrum “cheat sheet” style diagrams. I used this diagram until about 2008 when I got some very good feedback from a great trainer, Jim Heidema.

02 All of Scrum Diagram

Third Try

The changes I made were small, but to me, significant.  Changing from a “mathematical” language of “Sprint N”, “Sprint N+1″ to a more general language of “Current”, “Future” was a big deal.  I really struggled with that.  Probably because I was still relatively new to being non-technical.

03 All of Scrum Diagram

Diagram Four

This fourth diagram made some minor formatting changes, but most importantly added “Backlog Grooming”.  It’s funny how long I talked about grooming in my classes before realizing that it was missing from the diagram.  I used the previous diagram and this diagram for a couple years each before making a rather major change to create the next one.

04 All of Scrum Diagram

Fifth Go

A couple years ago I realized that I wasn’t really talking about the Scrum values in my classes.  I started to introduce them in some of my other handouts and discussions, but it still took a while for me to reflect those values in my diagram.  I had also received a lot of feedback that having two Product Backlogs in the diagram was confusing.  Finally, I realized that I was missing an opportunity to use colour more systematically.  So, a major reformatting, systematic colour coding and the addition of the Scrum values was my next change.

05 All of Scrum Diagram

Branded Diagram (ug.)

In a rush, I added some logos to the diagram. Just made it gross, but it’s badness, combined with feedback about said badness, actually inspired a major change for the next version.

05 All of Scrum Diagram - Branded

Newest Diagram

Literally just a week ago, I was showing my brand-new branded diagram to a bunch of people who really care about design and UX.  The very first comment when I handed out the diagram was: “wow, you can really tell this wasn’t done by a designer!”  Well, that got me thinking deeply about the diagram (again).  So, here is my newest, latest and greatest (still not done by a designer) version of my Scrum diagram!

06 The Scrum Process

The Future

I would absolutely love constructive feedback about this latest diagram. Of course, if you like it, please let me know that too! The thing I like about this is that it is a way of looking back at almost 9 years of my teaching history. Continuous improvement is so important, so I welcome your comments! If you have your own diagrams, please link to them in the comments – I would love to see those too! In fact, it would be really cool if a bunch of people could make little “Evolution of a Scrum Diagram” posts – let me know if you do!!!

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Great Article about TDD by J. B. Rainsberger

I just finished reading “Test-Driven Development as Pragmatic Deliberate Practice“.  Fantastic article.  I highly recommend it to anyone who is actively coding.  It strongly reflects my understanding of TDD as a fundamental technique in any Software Development Professional’s toolkit.

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ANN: Agile Software Engineering Practices training by Isráfíl Consulting

Isráfíl Consulting is finally prepared for the first series of its Agile Software Engineering Practices training courses. This series is offered in partnership with Berteig Consulting who are graciously hosting the registration process. Their team has also helped greatly in shaping the presentation style and structure of the course. The initial run will be in Ottawa, Toronto (Markham), and Kitchener/Waterloo.   

Topics covered will include Test Driven Development (TDD), testability, supportive infrastructure such as build and continuous integration, team metrics, incremental design and evolutionary architecture, dependency injection, and so much more. (This course won’t present the planning side of XP, but covers many other aspects common to XP projects) It makes a great complement for training in Agile Processes such as XP, Scrum, or OpenAgile. The overview slide presentation is available for free download from the Isráfíl web site.

The courses are scheduled for:

The course is $1250 CAD per student, and participants receive a transferrable discount of $100 CAD for other training with Berteig Consulting as a part of our ongoing partnership. I initially prototyped this course in Ottawa this December, and am very excited to see this through in several locales. Class size is limited to 15, so we can keep the instruction style more involved. The above schedules are linked to Berteig Consulting’s course system and have registration links at the bottom of the description. Locations are TBD, but will be updated at the above links as soon as they’re finalized.

A further series is planned for several US cities in March, and we’ll be sure to announce them as well.

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Yet another misunderstanding of TDD, testing, and code coverage

I was vaguely annoyed to see this blog article featured in JavaLobby’s recent mailout. Not because Kevin Pang doesn’t make some good points about the limits of code coverage, but because his title is needlessly controversial. And, because JavaLobby is engaging in some agile-baiting by publishing it without some editorial restraint.

In asking the question, “Is code coverage all that useful,” he asserts at the beginning of his article that Test Driven Development (TDD) proponents “often tend to push code coverage as a useful metric for gauging how well tested an application is.” This statement is true, but the remainder of the blog post takes apart code coverage as a valid “one true metric,” a claim that TDD proponents don’t make, except in Kevin’s interpretation.

He further asserts that “100% code coverage has long been the ultimate goal of testing fanatics.” This isn’t true. High code coverage is a desired attribute of a well tested system, but the goal is to have a fully and sufficiently tested system. Code coverage is indicative, but not proof, of a well-tested system. How do I mean that? Any system whose authors have taken the time to sufficiently test it such that it gets > 95% code coverage is likely (in my experience) thinking through how to test their system in order to fully express its happy paths, edge cases, etc. However, the code coverage here is a symptom, not a cause, of a well-tested system. And the metric can be gamed. Actually, when imposed as a management quality criterion, it usually is gamed. Good metrics should confirm a result obtained by other means, or provide leading indicators. Few numeric measurements are subtle enough to really drive system development.

Having said that, I have used code-coverage in this way, but in context, as I’ll mention later in this post.

Kevin provides example code similar to the following:

String foo(boolean condition) {
    if (condition)
        return "true";
    else
        return "false";
}

… and talks about how if the unit tests are only testing the true path, then this is only working on 50% coverage. Good so far. But then he goes on to express that “code coverage only tells us what was executed by our unit tests, not what executed correctly.” He is carefully telling us that a unit test executing a line doesn’t guarantee that the line is working as intended. Um… that’s obvious. And if the tests didn’t pass correctly, then the line should not be considered covered. It seems there are some unclear assumptions on how testing needs to work, so let me get some assertions out of the way…

  1. Code coverage is only meaningful in the context of well-written tests. It doesn’t save you from crappy tests.
  2. Code coverage should only be measured on a line/branch if the covering tests are passing.
  3. Code coverage suggests insufficiency, but doesn’t guarantee sufficiency.
  4. Test-driven code will likely have the symptom of nearly perfect coverage.
  5. Test-driven code will be sufficiently tested, because the author wrote all the tests that form, in full, the requirements/spec of that code.
  6. Perfectly covered code will not necessarily be sufficiently tested.

What I’m driving at is that Kevin is arguing against something entirely different than that which TDD proponents argue. He’s arguing against a common misunderstanding of how TDD works. On point 1 he and I are in agreement. Many of his commentators mention #3 (and he states it in various ways himself). His description of what code coverage doesn’t give you is absurd when you take #2 into account (we assume that a line of covered code is only covered if the covering test is passing). But most importantly – “TDD proponents” would, in my experience, find this whole line of explanation rather irrelevant, as it is an argument against code-coverage as a single metric for code quality, and they would attempt to achieve code quality through thoroughness of testing by driving the development through tests. TDD is a design methodology, not a testing methodology. You just get tests as side-effect artifacts of the approach. Useful in their own right? Sure, but it’s only sort of the point. It isn’t just writing the tests-first.

In other words – TDD implies high or perfect coverage. But the inverse is not necessarily true.

How do you achieve thoroughness by driving your development with tests? You imagine the functionality you need next (your next increment of useful change), and you write or modify your tests to “require” the new piece of functionality. They you write it, then you go green. Code coverage doesn’t enter into it, because you should have near perfect coverage at all times by implication, because every new piece of functionality you develop is preceded by tests which test its main paths and error states, upper and lower bounds, etc. Code coverage in this model is a great way to notice that you screwed up and missed something, but nothing else.

So, is code-coverage useful? Heck yeah! I’ve used coverage to discover lots of waste in my system. I’ve removed whole sets of APIs that were “just in case I need them” APIs, because they become rote (lots of accessors/mutators that are not called in normal operations). Is code coverage the only way I would find them? No. If I’m dealing with a system that wasn’t driven with tests, or was poorly tested in general, I may use coverage as a quick health meter, but probably not. Going from zero to 90% on legacy code is likely to be less valuable than just re-writing whole subsystems using TDD… and often more expensive.

Regardless, while Kevin is formally asking “is code coverage useful?” he’s really asking (rhetorically) is it reasonable to worship code coverage as the primary metric. But if no one’s asserting the positive, why is he questioning it? He may be dealing with a lot of people with misunderstandings of how TDD works. He could be dealing with metrics bigots. He could be dealing with management-imposed-metrics initiatives which often fail. It might be a pet peeve or he’s annoyed with TDD and this is a great way to do some agile-baiting of his own. I don’t know him, so I can’t say. His comments seem reasonable, so I assume no ill intent. But the answer to his rhetorical question is “yes, but in context.” Not surprising, since most rhetorically asked questions are answerable in this fashion. Hopefully it’s a bit clearer where it’s useful (and where/how) it’s not.

(This article is a cross-post from “Geek in a Suit”)

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Dependecy Injection on J2ME/CLDC devices.

This post is a little geeky and technical and product-related for AgileAdvice, and is a shameless self-promotion. Nevertheless, since testability, test-driven-development, and incremental design are non-exclusive sub-topics of Agile, I though I’d report this here anyway.

Many developers use the Dependency Injection and Inversion of Control (IoC) patterns through such IoC containers as Spring, Hivemind, Picocontainer, and others. They have all sorts of benefits to testability, flexibility, etc. that I won’t repeat here, but can be read about here, here, and here. A great summary of the history of “IoC” can be found here. J2ME developers, however, especially those on limited devices that use the CLDC configuration of J2ME, cannot use the substantial number of IoC/DI containers out there, because they nearly all rely on reflection. These also often make use of APIs not present in the CLDC – APIs which could not easily be added. Lastly there’s a tendency among developers of “embedded software” to be very suspicious of complexity.

In working out some examples of DI as part of a testability workshop at one of my clients, I whipped up a quick DI container, and being the freak that I am, hardened it until it was suitable for production, because I hate half-finished products. So allow me to introduce the Israfil Micro Container. (That is, the Container from the Israfil Micro project). As I mention in the docs, “FemtoContainer” just was too ridiculous, and this container is smaller than pico-container. The project is BSD licensed, and hosted on googlecode, so source is freely available and there’s an issue/feature tracker, yadda yadda.

Essentially I believe that people working on cellphones and set-top boxes shouldn’t be constrained out of some basic software design approaches – you just have to bend the design approach to fit the environment. So hopefully this is of use to more than one of my clients. It currently supports an auto-wiring registration, delayed object creation (until first need), and forthcoming are some basic lifecycle support, and a few other nicities. It does not use reflection (you use a little adapter for object creation instead), and performs quicker than pico-container. Low, low overhead. It’s also less than 10 classes and interfaces (including the two classes in the util project). It’s built with Maven2, so you can use it in any Maven2-built project with ease, but of course you can always also just download the jar (and the required util jar too). Enjoy…

P.S. There are a few other bits on googlecode that I’m working on in the micro-zone. Some minimalist backports of some of java.lang.concurrency (just the locks), as well as some of the java.util.Collections stuff. Not finished, but also part of the googlecode project.

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