Tag Archives: rules

The Rules of Scrum: Your Product Owner can veto the inclusion of an idea on the Product Backlog

The Product Owner is responsible for ensuring that the Product Backlog Items reflect and contribute to the vision of the product being built by the Scrum Team. Therefore, the Product Owner needs the authority to reject any suggestions for features, functionality or fit and finish that do not move the product towards that vision. This authority must be based on both the depth of knowledge of the Product Owner as well as formal responsibility granted by the organization. A Product Owner that does not have this authority to veto may nevertheless be able to accomplish the same thing by putting any unwelcome ideas at the very end of the Product Backlog based on authority to order the Product Backlog. The lack of this authority to veto can lead to a product with no integrity of vision, an erosion of the Product Owner’s authority to order the Product Backlog, and ultimately an erosion of the critical separation of powers between the Product Owner and the rest of the Scrum Team (the Product Owner with authority over “what to build” and the rest of the team with authority over “how to build it”).

To learn more about Product Owners, visit the Scrum Team Assessment.


Affiliated Promotions:

Try our automated online Scrum coach: Scrum Insight - free scores and basic advice, upgrade to get in-depth insight for your team. It takes between 8 and 11 minutes for each team member to fill in the survey, and your results are available immediately. Try it in your next retrospective.

Please share!
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

The Rules of Scrum: Your Product Owner is knowledgable about the product and the business

The Product Owner’s job is to be the customer or the customer proxy. He needs to know the most current information about the product and the business that the team is working in. If this is the case, then the Product Owner is able to make relevant choices about the product and will be able to answer the questions of the team. If this is not the case, then he will have to find someone else for the answers (which will cause waste), make up the answers (which will likely guide the team in the wrong direction), or fail to give the team what they need.

To learn more about your Product Owner, visit the Scrum Team Assessment.


Affiliated Promotions:

Try our automated online Scrum coach: Scrum Insight - free scores and basic advice, upgrade to get in-depth insight for your team. It takes between 8 and 11 minutes for each team member to fill in the survey, and your results are available immediately. Try it in your next retrospective.

Please share!
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

The Rules of Scrum: Your Product Owner has no duties outside the Product Owner duties

The Product Owner duties make up a full-time job on a Scrum Team. The Product Owner should not be a manager, a developer or have any other partial duties outside the role of Product Owner. This focus allows a Product Owner to complete their duties with complete focus and commitment to the success of the Product. Of course, in the creation of a Product and its vision, there are many things that need to be done with customers, users and other stakeholders, not just working with the Scrum Team directly. If the Product Owner has other duties outside of Product Owner duties, then one or more of the Product Owner duties are compromised, the Product Owner job is not being done and the team suffers. An individual who feels unable to serve as a full-time Product Owner should not accept this position or should work with their management to enable it to become a full-time position.

To learn more about a Product Owners duties, visit the Scrum Team Assessment.


Affiliated Promotions:

Try our automated online Scrum coach: Scrum Insight - free scores and basic advice, upgrade to get in-depth insight for your team. It takes between 8 and 11 minutes for each team member to fill in the survey, and your results are available immediately. Try it in your next retrospective.

Please share!
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

The Rules of Scrum: Your Product Owner uses the Sprint Review to help the team continuously improve the product

The Sprint Review is a key meeting for the team to improve the product. There are three main purposes of the Sprint Review: inspect how the last Sprint went with regards to the product; identify the items that are complete and order any potential changes; and, integrate those changes into the Product Backlog. This meeting aids the team in inspecting and adapting the entire product increment and how the team is progressing towards any deadlines. The Sprint Review is a check point that helps the Scrum Team to know the product’s current state, compare to its desired state, identify gaps, and take the needed steps to improve. This meeting is also where the Product Owner challenges the Scrum Team to look at the product clearly (it’s not just for the stakeholders!). When a Scrum Team refrains from having and participating in this essential meeting, the is team is likely to become a Scrum Team in name only without any of the far reaching benefits that many other Scrum Teams have experienced. A demonstration of the Product Backlog Items completed in the Sprint is often a part of this meeting.

What is the main purpose of the Sprint Review? Bottom line: to get feedback on how well the work the team is doing will satisfy business needs.  If the team isn’t getting that feedback in a practical concrete form, then the Sprint Review needs to be improved.


Affiliated Promotions:

Try our automated online Scrum coach: Scrum Insight - free scores and basic advice, upgrade to get in-depth insight for your team. It takes between 8 and 11 minutes for each team member to fill in the survey, and your results are available immediately. Try it in your next retrospective.

Please share!
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

The Rules of Scrum: Your Product Owner is truthful about the condition of the product (its value scope and costs)

The Product Owner has the most recent and important information about the value and cost of the product being delivered. This information can greatly serve the team by allowing them to understand the product’s current state and how this affect where they will be going in terms of the vision of the product. If the Product Owner is able to carry this out then the team will have relevant information that will aid them in their decisions and execution of the product. If this is not carried out then the team will be in the dark – they will make poor decisions and struggle with the feedback given by the stakeholders since they have no transparency into the reality of the product.

For more information about Product Owners, visit the Scrum Team Assessment.


Affiliated Promotions:

Try our automated online Scrum coach: Scrum Insight - free scores and basic advice, upgrade to get in-depth insight for your team. It takes between 8 and 11 minutes for each team member to fill in the survey, and your results are available immediately. Try it in your next retrospective.

Please share!
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

The Rules of Scrum: Your ScrumMaster creates and maintains the team’s Sprint burndown chart

The Sprint burndown chart tracks the amount of work remaining in the Sprint day-by-day. The burndown chart is updated daily and is visible to the team and stakeholders. This activity is part of the ScrumMaster’s duty to facilitate the Scrum Process. This activity is part of the ScrumMaster’s job to satisfy stakeholders as the chart allows the team to easily see how it is trending on committed deliverables. This information allows the team and the Product Owner to discuss any necessary adjustments to the team’s commitments for the current Sprint in a timely fashion. What happens if the ScrumMaster fails to create and/or maintain the team’s Sprint burndown chart? Most likely we will be unable to see if the team is on track, late or early in its current Sprint. To find out this information we would have to wait until the Sprint is done which is much too late. Also, without daily updates on the trend of the team it is more likely that Scrum Team Members may slip back into an individualistic approach to work instead a team based approach.

For more information about the turndown chart, visit the Scrum Team Assessment.


Affiliated Promotions:

Try our automated online Scrum coach: Scrum Insight - free scores and basic advice, upgrade to get in-depth insight for your team. It takes between 8 and 11 minutes for each team member to fill in the survey, and your results are available immediately. Try it in your next retrospective.

Please share!
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

The Rules of Scrum: Your ScrumMaster helps the team expand the definition of “done”

Delivery each Sprint of potentially “shippable” is at the heart of a true Scrum implementation. In order to help the team properly implement Scrum and derive the intended benefits of empirical process control and collaboration with stakeholders, the ScrumMaster needs to help the team expand its definition of done at least until it is able to deliver a potentially complete “shippable” increment of product every Sprint. The ScrumMaster should help the team to revise its definition of “done” every Sprint with the necessary adjustments being made as the result of the Sprint Retrospective. As Scrum teams mature, it is expected that their definitions of “done” will expand to include more stringent criteria for higher quality. The ScrumMaster should always be looking ahead to new ways that the team can expand its definition of “done” in order to deliver higher quality product to the stakeholders and exceed their expectations.

For more information on the definition of done, visit the Scrum Team Assessment.


Affiliated Promotions:

Try our automated online Scrum coach: Scrum Insight - free scores and basic advice, upgrade to get in-depth insight for your team. It takes between 8 and 11 minutes for each team member to fill in the survey, and your results are available immediately. Try it in your next retrospective.

Please share!
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

The Rules of Scrum: Your ScrumMaster never tells the team how to solve a technical problem

Solving technical problems is the job of the product developers on the Scrum Team, not the ScrumMaster. The ScrumMaster is responsible for the Scrum process and has authority over the team only in this limited realm. By overstepping the bounds of authority in this way, the ScrumMaster becomes an obstacle for the team by reducing its ability to self-organize. A ScrumMaster who is part of a team that has reached a high-performance state may be able to safely make technical suggestions, but should always be careful not to push the team to accept those suggestions.

To learn more about solving technical problems, visit the Scrum Team Assessment.


Affiliated Promotions:

Try our automated online Scrum coach: Scrum Insight - free scores and basic advice, upgrade to get in-depth insight for your team. It takes between 8 and 11 minutes for each team member to fill in the survey, and your results are available immediately. Try it in your next retrospective.

Please share!
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

The Rules of Scrum: Your ScrumMaster consistently avoids doing hands-on technical work with the team

The ScrumMaster is focused on two main goals: to remove obstacles of all sizes and to help the team become better at using Scrum. Both of these jobs require much work and plenty of skill. To do this well the ScrumMaster will need to refrain from doing hands-on technical work. If the ScrumMaster does this then the team will be protected from interruptions, move faster, and feel supported. If the ScrumMaster doesn’t do this then the team will be interrupted often, become slow, and feel unsafe and in harms way. A ScrumMaster doing hands-on technical is wasteful and distracting.

To learn more about ScrumMasters, visit the Scrum Team Assessment.


Affiliated Promotions:

Try our automated online Scrum coach: Scrum Insight - free scores and basic advice, upgrade to get in-depth insight for your team. It takes between 8 and 11 minutes for each team member to fill in the survey, and your results are available immediately. Try it in your next retrospective.

Please share!
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

The Rules of Scrum: Your ScrumMaster has the bandwidth and capacity to respond within minutes to the team’s questions

The ScrumMaster is a full Team Member of the Scrum Team and is required to be focused on helping the team achieve its goals. However, he does not do the work of the Sprint Backlog. Instead he focuses his energies on removing obstacles and helping use Scrum as best as possible. One way to achieve these goals is to be able to respond to questions by the team within minutes. If the ScrumMaster is able to do, the team will move faster, solve problems easier, and cut through obstacles much sooner. If the ScrumMaster is not able to do this, the team will become stalled, frustrated and likely lose trust in the ScrumMaster and the Scrum process.

To learn more about your ScrumMaster, visit the Scrum Team Assessment.


Affiliated Promotions:

Try our automated online Scrum coach: Scrum Insight - free scores and basic advice, upgrade to get in-depth insight for your team. It takes between 8 and 11 minutes for each team member to fill in the survey, and your results are available immediately. Try it in your next retrospective.

Please share!
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

The Rules of Scrum: Your ScrumMaster is expected to work diligently to remove organizational obstacles

One of the valuable and important responsibilities of the ScrumMaster is to remove obstacles that impede the team’s work. This is necessary so that the team can become more and more productive in their work which gives greater value to the company. If the ScrumMaster does not work diligently on removing these organizations obstacles, the team will get bogged down by challenges and become demotivated to progress, and their morale will drop and become apathetic to the work and to Scrum. The benefit of removing these large obstacles is that it speeds up the cycle time of the work by the team. This is essential so the Team Members can focus their energies on delivering working software.

To learn more about organizational obstacles, visit the Scrum Team Assessment.


Affiliated Promotions:

Try our automated online Scrum coach: Scrum Insight - free scores and basic advice, upgrade to get in-depth insight for your team. It takes between 8 and 11 minutes for each team member to fill in the survey, and your results are available immediately. Try it in your next retrospective.

Please share!
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

The Rules of Scrum: Your ScrumMaster is empowered to immediately remove in-team obstacles

One of the primary ways that the ScrumMaster serves the team is by removing impediments to the progress of the team. If the team does not have what it needs to progress in its work, whether it be technology, tools, the right space, etc., the ScrumMaster must have the authority to immediately fill those gaps for the team. The ScrumMaster should not need permission from management in order to get the team what it needs. There should be request procedure that the ScrumMaster needs to go through in order to get sign-off from acquisition departments and what not. At the same time, if there are interpersonal issues between team members, the ScrumMaster must be empowered to intervene and help individuals overcome their differences without the involvement or permission from their direct line managers. Any process or procedure that the ScrumMaster is forced to follow prolongs the impediment for the team as well as the consequential waste and unrealized delivery of value.

To learn more about in-team obstacles, visit the Scrum Team Assessment.


Affiliated Promotions:

Try our automated online Scrum coach: Scrum Insight - free scores and basic advice, upgrade to get in-depth insight for your team. It takes between 8 and 11 minutes for each team member to fill in the survey, and your results are available immediately. Try it in your next retrospective.

Please share!
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

The Rules of Scrum: All people outside the team know that it is the ScrumMaster’s job to shield the team from interruptions

A ScrumMaster is an individual who both guides and protects the Scrum Team. One of the ways that the ScrumMaster protects the Scrum Team is by shielding it from interruptions. The interruptions that the ScrumMaster cares about stopping are those that are from outside the team when they are in a Sprint. Most interruptions are not related to the team’s current work and need to be blocked by the ScrumMaster so that the team will be able to focus on its current goal: the Sprint and its Product Backlog Items. All of the stakeholders of the team need to be aware that the ScrumMaster is responsible for blocking these interruptions. This awareness creates a freedom for the ScrumMaster to do this very difficult part of the job in a way that is transparent and effective. If the stakeholders are not aware of this part of the job, then they may become upset when interruptions are blocked or find ways around the ScrumMaster to get interruptions to specific team members. If the team is not aware that this is the ScrumMaster’s job, they may feel trapped, may lose hope in the Scrum process, may take on the work themselves (which will be too much for them since they are responsible for the execution of the Sprint goal), feel unsafe which could lead to hiding obstacles (which causes waste and delays), and it may even cause Team Members to accept interruptions as normal which will create an environment where interruptions and unrelated requests become widespread. All of these negatives effects and many more can be solved by the organization knowing that the ScrumMaster’s job is to shield the team from interruptions.

To learn more about a ScrumMasters duties, visit the Scrum team Assessment.


Affiliated Promotions:

Try our automated online Scrum coach: Scrum Insight - free scores and basic advice, upgrade to get in-depth insight for your team. It takes between 8 and 11 minutes for each team member to fill in the survey, and your results are available immediately. Try it in your next retrospective.

Please share!
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

The Rules of Scrum: Your ScrumMaster is allowed to communicate directly with any stakeholder of the team

It is the ScrumMaster’s job to remove the Scrum Team’s obstacles that occur through all levels of the organization. To do this properly the ScrumMaster must be able to connect directly with all stakeholders of the team including those outside the organization. This direct communication aids in addressing identified obstacles with the appropriate individual or group. Without the ScrumMaster being allowed this direct communication, he will have to deal with a third party which may distort the information and/or be unable to convey the importance of removing an obstacle or addressing a need. The ScrumMaster is like a catalyst that should be able to set ablaze those individuals that are interacting or connecting with the team either directly or indirectly.

To learn more about ScrumMasters, visit the Scrum Team Assessment.


Affiliated Promotions:

Try our automated online Scrum coach: Scrum Insight - free scores and basic advice, upgrade to get in-depth insight for your team. It takes between 8 and 11 minutes for each team member to fill in the survey, and your results are available immediately. Try it in your next retrospective.

Please share!
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

The Rules of Scrum: Your ScrumMaster can enforce timeboxes within the team (e.g. meetings)

The responsibility of time boxing (or limiting the amount of time spent) in a Scrum meeting is given to the ScrumMaster. He maintains a time-box so that the Scrum Team will become more and more effective in how they use the time to its full purpose. We, as human beings, thrive in situations where we have simple constraints and focused goals – time-boxing of Scrum meetings fits this perfectly. If a Scrum Planning meeting, for example, is not time-boxed it can become disconnected from the goal of the Scrum Team. Time-boxing also helps Team Members to be engaged, since they have a limited amount of time to achieve the goal of the meeting – such as a Sprint Goal that is generated from the Sprint Planning meeting.

To learn more about how you can improve your Scrum meetings, visit the Scrum Team Assessment.


Affiliated Promotions:

Try our automated online Scrum coach: Scrum Insight - free scores and basic advice, upgrade to get in-depth insight for your team. It takes between 8 and 11 minutes for each team member to fill in the survey, and your results are available immediately. Try it in your next retrospective.

Please share!
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
Berteig
Upcoming Courses
View Full Course Schedule
Certified Scrum Product Owner® (CSPO) [Virtual Learning]
Online
C$1795.00
Aug 18
2020
Details
**NEW** Kanban Maturity Model (KMM) {Virtual Learning]
Online
C$2495.00
Aug 24
2020
Details
Certified ScrumMaster® (CSM) [Virtual Learning]
Online
C$1595.00
Aug 25
2020
Details
Advanced Certified ScrumMaster® (A-CSM) [1-Day Accelerated]
Online
C$1695.00
Aug 27
2020
Details
**NEW** Kanban Coaching Practices (KCP) [Virtual Learning]
Online
C$2495.00
Aug 27
2020
Details
**NEW** Advanced Certified Scrum Product Owner® (A-CSPO)
Online
C$1599.00
Aug 28
2020
Details
Certified ScrumMaster® (CSM) [Virtual Learning]
Online
C$1595.00
Sep 9
2020
Details
Advanced Certified ScrumMaster® (A-CSM) [1-Day Accelerated]
Online
C$1440.75
Sep 16
2020
Details
Certified ScrumMaster® (CSM) [Virtual Learning]
Online
C$1355.75
Sep 22
2020
Details
Team Kanban Practitioner® (TKP) [Virtual Learning]
Online
C$1015.75
Sep 24
2020
Details
Certified Scrum Product Owner® (CSPO) [Virtual Learning]
Online
C$1525.75
Sep 29
2020
Details
Kanban System Design® (KMP I) [Virtual Learning]
Online
C$1525.75
Sep 30
2020
Details
Certified ScrumMaster® (CSM) [Virtual Learning]
Online
C$1355.75
Oct 6
2020
Details
Advanced Certified ScrumMaster® (A-CSM) [1-Day Accelerated]
Online
C$1440.75
Oct 14
2020
Details
Certified ScrumMaster® (CSM) [Virtual Learning]
Online
C$1355.75
Oct 20
2020
Details
Certified Scrum Product Owner® (CSPO) [Virtual Learning]
Online
C$1525.75
Oct 27
2020
Details
Team Kanban Practitioner® (TKP) [Virtual Learning]
Online
C$1015.75
Nov 2
2020
Details
Certified ScrumMaster® (CSM) [Virtual Learning]
Online
C$1355.75
Nov 3
2020
Details
Advanced Certified ScrumMaster® (ACSM) [1-Day Accelerated]
Online
C$1440.75
Nov 10
2020
Details
Kanban System Design® (KMPI) [Virtual Learning]
Online
C$1525.75
Nov 19
2020
Details
Certified Scrum Product Owner® (CSPO) [Virtual Learning]
Online
C$1525.75
Nov 24
2020
Details
Kanban Systems Improvement® (KMPII) [Virtual Learning]
Online
C$1525.75
Nov 26
2020
Details
Team Kanban Practitioner® (TKP) [Virtual Learning]
Online
C$1015.75
Dec 10
2020
Details
Certified Scrum Product Owner® (CSPO) [Virtual Learning]
Online
C$1525.75
Dec 15
2020
Details