Re-launch of Real Agility Newsletter

Hi Everyone!  Berteig Consulting is going to re-launch their monthly newsletter starting this month!  We’re excited about it because, although it is partly due to a legal change around commercial email here in Canada, we are considering this a great opportunity to change the style of our communication with our customers and our colleagues.  Like before, we plan to have a few regular segments:

  1. A message from me, Mishkin Berteig, that shares my personal experiences with Agile, with running an Agile consultancy, and other things that I hope will be interesting.
  2. A “Coaching Corner” article written by one of our coaches, or by a guest author, about how organizations, teams and people can become more Agile.  Topics will range from technical to people-oriented, practical to theoretical, cutting-edge to deeply retrospective.  We hope these articles will become a great resource – and they won’t be cross-posted here on Agile Advice.
  3. A listing of our upcoming training.  We’re excited that in the fall and in the new year we are going to start offering some things besides just ScrumMaster and Product Owner training including training on Agile Coaching, SAFe (and maybe even other enterprise agile frameworks), and topics closely related to Agile such as leadership, communication, etc.
  4. And of course, a “special offers” section that will promote new products or services from us or from close partners that we think will be helpful.

Please subscribe to our Real Agility Newsletter by clicking on the link:

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Two reviews of SAFe (Scaled Agile Framework)

SAFe (Scaling Agile Framework) is gaining in popularity.  Ron Jeffries recently attended a SAFe training session and has written a great review.  I particularly like what Ron says about the idea of being properly Agile:

SAFe will be successful in the market. People will benefit. They just won’t benefit nearly as much as they might if they set out to do things in a fashion that truly supports Agile Values and Principles.

SAFe is good. It’s just not good enough. It provides some benefit, but endangers an organization’s progress toward really high functioning. As someone who has been in the Agile movement since before it started, I do not like it. It’s fast food. You can do better.

 

Neil Killick seems to have even stronger opinions about SAFe, and is quite direct about them.  I like what he says in one of the comments on his blog post:

So you can go the SAFe path or the Scrum and Agile path. All you need to do i[s] figure out how big a cliff you want to deal with down the road.

I don’t personally have any experience with SAFe so I won’t make any big claims about it either way.  However, I do appreciate that the popularity of SAFe, like the popularity of Agile/Scrum* will probably lead to studies showing modest qualitative improvements of 20% to 40% increases in productivity.  Is this just the Hawthorn Effect at work?

When I help an organization with Agile principles and methods, I hope and expect dramatic measurable improvements.  Sometimes this results in people losing their jobs.  Sometimes this means people have nervous breakdowns.  It can be very painful in the short term.  SAFe, by it’s very name, seems to be anti-pain.  That doesn’t bode well.

Here are a few other interesting links to information about the Scaled Agile Framework:

Has SAFe Cracked the Large Agile Adoption Nut? – InfoQ

Unsafe at Any Speed – Ken Schwaber

Kanban – the anti-SAFe for almost a decade already – David Andersen

* There is no such thing as “Agile/Scrum” but that’s what lots of people call Scrum when they don’t do Scrum properly.

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