Tag Archives: team development

The Importance of Emotional Intelligence in the Agile and Corporate World

Emotional intelligence (EQ) is a topic that has not been fully addressed on this site, nor in the agile or corporate world, yet it has great ramifications for anyone choosing or hoping to practice Agile and/ or Scrum.

I obliquely touch on it in my article: The Soft Skills Revolution: Why You May Want Team Development and I think I can safely equate most “soft skills” with “emotional intelligence.”

My purpose is not to connect the dots for anyone, but simply to introduce the idea. If you go to the site below and read the materials and watch the videos, you may understand for yourself the importance of emotional intelligence in all that you are endeavouring to do. Thanks to John Hawthorne for pointing this out to me – enjoy.

https://www.cornerstone.edu/blogs/lifelong-learning-matters/post/are-you-emotionally-intelligent-heres-how-to-tell


Affiliated Promotions:

Try our automated online Scrum coach: Scrum Insight - free scores and basic advice, upgrade to get in-depth insight for your team. It takes between 8 and 11 minutes for each team member to fill in the survey, and your results are available immediately. Try it in your next retrospective.

Please share!
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

“Teams” Larger Than Eleven Are Not Scrum Teams

Mobbing Team

Scrum suggests the size of the Development Team (the Scrum Team members who perform the work of the Sprint Backlog) be between three (3) and nine (9) people. (The Scrum Master and Product Owner are not included in that count unless they are also executing the work of the Sprint Backlog.) To maximize cohesion and minimize complexity, it is important larger groups be split into smaller units or downsized.

Considerations for re-organizing into multiple Scrum Teams:

  • People executing the work may be best suited to decide optimal team size and composition. Adjustments to team composition will be most effective if the team members are trusted (and supported) to re-organize around their own work.
  • Groups larger than eleven people often naturally subdivide into smaller, cross-functional sub-groups; therefore it may be possible to carefully observe which team members interact regularly while getting work done and simply acknowledge those informal arrangements.
  • In order to minimize dependencies between teams, Scrum Teams whose mandates are to own discreet Products or systems are preferable to groups whose mandates are to support “components” of larger systems.
  • Organizations which currently employ Project Management methods ought to consider changing budgeting & staffing practices to align around Product delivery rather than Project Management. Doing so will make value streams transparent and bring clarity to Product-centric team mandates.

Affiliated Promotions:

Try our automated online Scrum coach: Scrum Insight - free scores and basic advice, upgrade to get in-depth insight for your team. It takes between 8 and 11 minutes for each team member to fill in the survey, and your results are available immediately. Try it in your next retrospective.

Please share!
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

High-Performance Teams: Where Does Trust Fit In?

Mobbing TeamAt a recent Agile Coach Camp I attended in June, a fellow participant said it best when he commented that as a software developer who had not really had an interest in people or relationships before, agile changed everything for him. He said Agile methods gave him a way to communicate with others, to trust them, and to understand how to work together to deliver excellent products.

What this gentleman was referring to, perhaps unknowingly, is one of the stages of team development. When an individual moves through stages of not trusting to trusting they are participating in an evolutionary process with a positive end result.

Daniela Moinau writes about this process in her article entitled, “High-performance Teams: Understanding Team Cohesiveness.”

She writes, “Once the storming stage is overcome the team is ready to establish open communications, stable positions and norms – the norming phase. Trust is finally gained, and “when the trust account is high, communication is easy, instant, and effective.” These are the first steps towards cohesiveness. Once cohesiveness is achieved, teams will move from norming to performing and subsequently to highly performing. ”

So while it may appear somewhat obvious that teams would trust one another, its not obvious to everyone. Each person carries their own unique history and their life experiences are of value. These experiences shaped who they are and what they have become. These experiences, whether pleasant or traumatic, shape a person’s ability to trust.

Agile methods to challenge teams to trust on a more profound level because of the nature of the values and principles which insist on it.

When a person, such as the software developer I mentioned in the first paragraph, overcomes his own internal patterns and learns to trust in a new way it leads to cohesiveness for him and his team. And this cohesiveness leads to high-performance.

As it turns out, trust is essential.


Affiliated Promotions:

Try our automated online Scrum coach: Scrum Insight - free scores and basic advice, upgrade to get in-depth insight for your team. It takes between 8 and 11 minutes for each team member to fill in the survey, and your results are available immediately. Try it in your next retrospective.

Please share!
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Are Agile Teams Just More Comfortable Being Uncomfortable?

Stretch Goals - failure can be disasterous

Lately I’ve been appreciating the Top 100 Agile Websites compiled by Oikosofy.

Just out of curiosity, I thought I’d check out Number 100, just to see who was the lucky guy who wasn’t listed as number 101.

What I found was a delightfully surprising and pleasantly entertaining blog by a coach named Yves Hanoulle. One article which particularly caught my attention is called “Getting out of your comfort zone.”

8 key points for coaches creating safety for their teams
  1. Getting out of your comfort zone is important for personal improvement  
  2. When you do experiements as a coach to learn people about this, people might see things differently, because of their earlier experiences.  
  3. Give people a safe environment so they can learn to push their boundaries.  
  4. People need to feel safe to move out of their comfort zone.  
  5. The Safety Zone is bigger then Comfort Zone.
  6.  Stepping out of your Comfort zone increases the size of Safety Zone.
  7.  Staying to long in your Comfort Zone decreases your safe zone.
  8. Safety zone is perceived.

His reflections after a training seminar on the topic really made a lot of sense to me.

Basically, an agile team is striving to create a Safe Zone for themselves and their team-mates so people will take risks and move out of their comfort zone. In order to do this, they are or become really comfortable with that uneasy state of being uncomfortable.

It’s as though it is no longer uncomfortable to be uncomfortable.

When an agile team moves out of its Comfort Zone together and everyone feels safe and supported, the end result is the type of team described in the Agile Manifesto. It’s the type of team companies really get excited about. It’s the type of team people love to work with and in doing so they may find they love their work more than ever.


Affiliated Promotions:

Try our automated online Scrum coach: Scrum Insight - free scores and basic advice, upgrade to get in-depth insight for your team. It takes between 8 and 11 minutes for each team member to fill in the survey, and your results are available immediately. Try it in your next retrospective.

Please share!
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Do Agile Teams ‘Storm’ In Different Ways?

Team Discussion

Agile transformation coaches promise their clients the positive outcome of “high-performance teams.”

According to the well-cited Psychologist B.W Tuchman, teams go through four stages on their way to high-performance. The end result seems to be a self-organizing team which effectively delivers to clients or customers with increasing satisfaction and continuous development and growth.

However, agile teams are different than regular teams. Aren’t they?

What I mean is, right from the outset individuals in an agile culture expect to confront change with positive stride. They are expected to be able to adapt to quickly even in uncertain environments. Therefore, their experience of team development is different, right from the outset.

Consider what Debbie Madden has to say in her article The Increasing Fluidity of Agile Practices Across Teams. She writes that, “most companies either claim they are Agile, are trying to become Agile, or have tried Agile. In truth, what I see today is a lot of customized Agile. In fact, the term “Traditional Agile” has come to mean the pure, original implementation of Agile. And, most companies are not following “Traditional Agile”. Instead, teams are customizing Agile to fit their needs, making the fluidity of Agile more prominent now than ever before.”

What this says to me is that since “Traditional Agile” has been around long enough now, teams have internalized the principles and values enough to understand change is to be expected and they have strategies in place to adapt well.

It says to me that teams are now taking Agile to a whole new level. They are making it their own. Adapting. Shaping. Moulding. Sculpting. The fluid nature of Agile gives teams permission to do this.

If we take Tuchman’s four-stage model and insert some agile thinking what we might come out with is an awareness that agile teams do what Debbie said they do. They make things up as they go along and they get the job done.

In this way, what might have been called “storming” by the old standards and definitions of team development can really also be called “high-performance” when the team is agile.

Perhaps some agile teams can create their own team development model and one of the stages is “high-performing storming” and maybe that is not even the final outcome but maybe it is the starting point on Day One!

Wouldn’t that be something?


Affiliated Promotions:

Try our automated online Scrum coach: Scrum Insight - free scores and basic advice, upgrade to get in-depth insight for your team. It takes between 8 and 11 minutes for each team member to fill in the survey, and your results are available immediately. Try it in your next retrospective.

Please share!
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Link: The Cost of Turnover on an Agile Team

Great article by Mike Griffiths: http://leadinganswers.typepad.com/leading_answers/2015/10/agile-talent-management.html


Affiliated Promotions:

Try our automated online Scrum coach: Scrum Insight - free scores and basic advice, upgrade to get in-depth insight for your team. It takes between 8 and 11 minutes for each team member to fill in the survey, and your results are available immediately. Try it in your next retrospective.

Please share!
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail